Email:
lrbald@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
04 Jan 2003

Question

Hi, Mine name is chris and i am doing a course on sports science and it involves me knowing the correct technique and ways to coach this for certain sports. I would like to know the common faults of a basketball layup and ways to correct these. cheers chris


Email:
lrbald@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
04 Jan 2003

Question

Hi, Mine name is chris and i am doing a course on sports science and it involves me knowing the correct technique and ways to coach this for certain sports. I would like to know the common faults of a basketball layup and ways to correct these. cheers chris

Email:
shira14mk@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
18 Dec 2002

Question

hi my name is Aleksandar Stefanovski and im from Republic of Macedonia. i hope you know where is that. if you dont know it is south of serbia native contry of Divac and Stojakovic. i want to thanks to this site becose i work with you. i looked all your things about basketball and i think that you are great. im playing basketball and study basketball on macedonian unversity, but from next year im going serbia on basketball academy in belgrade . thas school for coaches is the best in europe wich president of the union of the coaches is Dusan Duda Ivkovic. the situation with the coaches in masedonia is very bad. there is a people who play well this game and understand but they doesnt know to teach kids to come a big players. i want to ask you some thing, to give me your bank number., to send you money to buy your book, becouse i dont use credit card. please do this for me. well im gona cooperate with you and you my ask me anyting you want about macedonian basketball, and you can write to me and come in my contry any time you want to be my gests. well thats for now we will be in touch. bue Aleksandar

Answer

Thank you for your email. I do not have a book. Everything I offer is on my site and you may read it or print it for free. I would love to visit your country sometime, maybe when I retire. I wish you success in coaching and hope you can write again sometime.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
19 Dec 2002

Question

what are the basketball postions for the basketball players?

Answer

In the classic sense there is a center, two forwards and two guards.


Email:
wash3417@bellsouth.net
Response Type:
Date:
19 Dec 2002

Question

What is the correct way to shoot a free-throw?

Answer

Check the article on this site that has instruction from several coaches about shooting free throws.


Email:
psychotash@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
25 Dec 2002

Question

where can I find a list of Devision 1 collage basketball and football coaches

Answer

Use the search box on the links page. It will connect you with www.yahoo.com


Email:
melaniea1990@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
17 Dec 2002

Question

Hello my name is melanie anne suttle i would like to know why cant wnba and nba players play together in 1 game like play a whole game mixed with men and woman on the court?

Answer

That is an interesting idea for a one time event. But I don't think you will see professional coed basketball league unless the public becomes willing to watch it and make the owners, players and producers a lot of money.


Email:
seufers6@charter.net
Response Type:
Date:
15 Dec 2002

Question

I have a small team with one big girl. Is there a particular offense on your webpage that you would recommend me to run to beat the 1-3-1 defense? I am coaching a girl's team of 4th, 5th, and 6th graders.

Thanks, Ann Seufer

Answer

Try the article Easy Offensive Sets and look at the play called Four Out. It uses a screen on those outside defenders to create openings. The diagram shows a 212 zone, but this play works real well against zones with three guards out front like the 32 and the 131.


Email:
egbobsin@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
17 Dec 2002

Question

I am the coach of a boys 11 team. The league only allows 1 one hr practice a week so it limits teaching. My team has 2 great guards but the rest of the team is big and slow. I have 2 urgent issues.

1. Effective way to break a full court press - we got killed by it last week.

2. Simple offense to teach - I have tried to teach them 6-7 plays, but often they get disrupted by the defense. Is there a simple setup with playr rotations that would allow for some semblance of order? Ideally, the result for one of the two guards to get a good shot.

Thanks.

Geoff Bobsin

Answer

Your issues are urgent, but not serious. You have the tools to fix them. For the press, have a big guy inbound the ball to one of your two good guards. Then the big guy follows the ball upcourt and acts as a safety pass receiver if you need to reverse the ball to avoid traps. Your other two big guys should run up court one per side. One goes long, the other to half court. The half court big guy should break into the middle and get a pass from the guards. The guards run by and get the ball back. The pass to mid court will wreck their press. Be sure to avoid traps and pass instead of dribble and you will be OK.

As for the offense, try the Easy Offensive Sets article. There is a play called High Low that is easy to teach and remember. The only things you will need to work on in that play are the fundamental pass and cut, give and go, rotate the ball to the weak side kind of options.


Email:
lilchick4814@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
13 Dec 2002

Question

how long do u think i would have to go to collage if i want to be a basketball coach.

Answer

Depends on who you want to coach. To be a coach for elementary school age players, you probably just need to volunteer with an organization like the YMCA or Boys and Girls Club. They will likely offer some basic training, too. That experience will give you an excellent start for learning how to teach the game. If you have aspirations for coaching in high school, the best way is to first become a teacher, so that means at least four years and earning a teaching certificate. As a teacher, you will be given priority for coaching positions that open up. If your dream is to coach in college, you need to hook up with a college team as an assistant and expect to apprentice for several seasons. Anyway, I encourage you to start with youngsters and then volunteer to work with older kids as you get better. The nice thing about coaching (compared to playing basketball) is that you can get better every year, even when you're too old to play anymore.


Email:
loucavallaro@attbi.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
15 Dec 2002

Question

Describe the 5 man weave?

Answer

Here's one way ...

Line up you players in 5 line. From left to right they are 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 2 has the ball and passes to 3, then cuts around 3, 4, and 5 to the outside lane. 3 drives left to the lane 2 vacated and passes to 1. 3 then cuts behind 1 and up the left outside lane. 3 passes the ball to 4 and cuts behind 4, 5 and 2. 4 passes to 3 and cuts left and behind 3. Draw it our on a piece of paper to visualize it.


Email:
grgaul@rfsd.k12.wi.us
Response Type:
Date:
11 Dec 2002

Question

Hello, I am a HS coach and would like to know what is the best breakers you have for attacking a 1-3-1 half court trap? thanks greg

Answer

I have run that press before and the thing that breaks it the best is when the other team manages to get the ball into the middle around the top of the key, usually a taller player who can pass. Once the ball is there, all four quadrants of the half court are weakly defended. A couple quick passes to breaking teammates and you get an open shot. So, we emphasize effective traps and pass denial to that middle spot, but it isn't fool proof. Like any press, it may buy you a quarter or two. I don't teach certain press breakers for every press. I don't have time. I prefer to teach players to draw the traps, but pass before they close, keep good spacing, and pass as soon as someone is open.


Email:
s7103638@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
12 Dec 2002

Question

how to jump higher

Answer

The cheap way ... good, old fashioned exercise. Practice jumping. How many times can you jump and touch the backboard in 30 seconds? Try it every day and keep track. Jump up stairs, like all the way up a tall building. The more expensive way, try the jump soles banner on my front page and follow the program shown in the provided video.



Email:
xxbabyphatxx882
Response Type:
Date:
09 Dec 2002

Question

hey, wudd up n2m just chillin i just wanted to write to da foot ball team da hurricans b-c dat is muh favorite team and dat were im from is MIA BEBE but i just wanted to say yall did good this year and good luck next year!!! MuCh LuV Valerie jackson W-B

2 Xxbabyphatxx882 at aol.com


Email:
dstuermann@ofsd.k12.mo.us
Response Type:
Date:
09 Dec 2002

Question

Are you familiar with any basic offences that will be effective against a triangle and two "D" , that does not involve a post player.

Answer

Try the article on this site that is called, "Beating Junk Defenses". It explains how to take advantage of the rules the Triangle and 2 imposes on itself. You do not need post players to do this offense.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
10 Dec 2002

Question

For my group of 6th grade girls, I started a simple give and go offense out of a 1-4 alignment... (point and 4 at ft line and extended). Our 1st look at it was last night in practice. So far, the kids have been drilled that if the point dribbles hard at the wing position...that's the key for the wing to go back-door basket cut. If the defender overplays the wing, the wing goes backdoor basket cut. If the defender merely sits back and allows the pass from the point, then we just start in the give and go, with the point passing to wing, then cutting off a screen at the high post. Those are the basic rules to our offense.

So far, we've only instituted the wing pass in this simple offense. I was wondering what ideas folks would have about quick hitting offenses/plays from getting passes in to high post positions, rather than wings. Any suggestions welcome. I just need to include the high posts more than setting some screen and rolls.

Answer

Well, there are lots of possibilities. You are set up like a flex offense. You might read up on that to see some of the normal patterns. A couple easy options you simply add would be:

1. Once the ball is at the wing, have the ball side post screen away for the other post who then curls to the basket. Or...

2. Once the ball is at wing, the ball side post could go baseline and back, then set up a pick and roll for the ball handler.


Email:
bad_dawg200321@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
10 Dec 2002

Question

Hey there! I am from Beaufort, South Carolina. i am crazy about Basketball. Well, I have 2 questions for you, First ok I am 20 yrs old and i wanna play basketball like tryout for a NBA team just to see I do or make the team. I had a dream since i was 7 to play professional basketball. How can i get to tryout for a team from where i am from. The second question is that why dont basketball scouts come out to the parks and look for talent or a skilled player. Thanks a lot

Answer

The NBA has hordes of talent to choose from. Players who have great talent and skills are represented by scouts and agents from all over the world who have connections with the NBA teams. Why should NBA scouts visit parks when they have highly skilled players brought to their door? Its a business. Players are the commodity and need to be marketed. If your are serious about being seen, then you need to play the business game, too. Find someone who will help you with the marketing and connections. If you think an NBA scout will happen to watch you at the park and then be so impressed that you get invited to a camp, that's not a dream, it's a fantasy. One huge reason NBA hopefuls should go to college and play is that level of competition provides exposure with good competition. The next best chance is joining the highest level club team you can and get some tapes made. That would be a start. Playing in the park won't get you much but a pleasant afternoon. Have you tried contacting NBA teams in your general area? Maybe their front offices will have some suggestions.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
28 Nov 2002

Question

what is the measurement of how far the freethrow line from the basketball hoop? how tall is the hoop if you are playing high school basketball?

Answer

You guys are killing me with this free throw line distance question. It has been asked here three or four times in the past month or so. Its 15' from the free throw line to the backboard. The rim has an 18 inch diameter. So, the distance from the free throw line to the hoop will be from 13.5 feet to fifteen feet depending on where your measuring at the hoop. The rim is 10 from the floor in high school basketball.


Email:
leebee@mtaonline.net
Response Type:
Date:
02 Dec 2002

Question

How did you get so smart and why did I miss it when watching you over the years?

Answer

I'm not all that smart. Sometimes it may look that way when I try to emulate my first coach (my dad).


Email:
spartan@i2k.net
Response Type:
Date:
25 Nov 2002

Question

I am looking for information on how to run a 1-2-2 full court press. If you could give me any information it would be greatly appreciated.

Answer

There is an article in the Coach's Notebook that covers the 1-2-1-1 (Implementing a Press). The only difference is where you start your two back players. The advantage to the 122 is better coverage against a sideline break past the half court line, but you are more exposed to a pass to middle court which will be the standard press breaker used against you. My philosophy is that all presses are essentially the same. No matter where you position the players, they must distort according to ball movement. Key teaching points are how to perform traps, anticipate passes and once the ball passes you, get all the way back on defense.


Email:
whereisthebeach@shaw.ca
Response Type:
Date:
26 Nov 2002

Question

Hi, I was wondering if you have any tips on what to do during tryouts for a Jr. High basketball team. I am new to coaching and am not too sure what drills or activities I should do in tryouts.

Answer

Do you have a large number of candidates? The more kids you have, the more difficult the process. Be sure to allow enough time for paperwork/registration at the start. You need a way to identify all the kids like having them wear numbers. List their names and ages/grades. Have them run a series of easy drills to see how they dribble, pass and shoot. Run a shell drill to see if they have had any defensive training. Let them scrimmage 3 on 3 in short bursts to see what they do when competing.

There is an article called Selecting Players on my site that offers more things to consider.


Email:
schiebel@schs.k12.mn.us
Response Type:
Date:
27 Nov 2002

Question

I run a basic motion offense with my 8th grade girls team. My problem is that in practice they work through the offense well, but in games they seem to panic, lose patience and force the ball. We are a very athletic team that is able to win despite poor execution. What can I do in practice/games to get them to slow down? Thanks, jojar

You need to maintain intensity in practice so the kids are used to the pressure. Add the competitive atmosphere. Many teams run analytical, non-competitive practices when they need to also try and duplicate game-like pressure and situations. Add an extra player to the defense. Set time limitations (10 seconds to score kind of thing). Give one group 2 minutes to overcome a 10 point lead. Practicing with pressure is what you need. Maintaining pressure and competition, run elements of your motion by breaking it down into 2v2 and 3v3 elements. Focus on the details and allow reset opportunities.


Email:
Whangdoodle12@cs.com
Response Type:
Date:
23 Nov 2002

Question

I am doing a class project and I am supposed to teach the class something that I know how to do, so I picked How to do a layup. So I was wondering if you have any written papers on your site that I can use to help me do my report. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Whangdoodle12

Answer

Dang, Wangdoodle, what a good question. Be a little patient. A new layup article is in the works!


Email:
JEThom@Hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
24 Nov 2002

Question

I need any help on drills and thoughts on matchup zone. We play man/man principles in areas.

Answer

This is one of those times when you will be best served at http://www.bbhighway.com/


Email:
jbehr@tallgrasstech.com
Response Type:
Date:
25 Nov 2002

Question

I am the coach for a 7th grade boys basketball team. I appreciate your articles and comments on coaching your own kid, it can be very difficult to seperate coach and Dad.

I have a basketball question.. What is the best way to handle a quick, trapping, half court zone defense. We face this alot, because of all the pressure we can't run the plays that we have worked on for zone defenses. But yet just passing the ball around gets us to many turnovers.

Any advise would be greatly appreciated..

Answer

Half court traps a very effective against inexperienced teams because they apply pressure exactly where the opponent wants to be left alone. All teams practice starting plays with the point passing to the wing. But, what if you pressure the point and take away the pass to the wing? Often team are totally unprepared for that! All their offensive practice is essentially wasted because they can't use it in a game.

A half court press is just an extended zone. But, where against a conventional zone you had to work for a deliberate payoff, now you go for the kill quickly while the defense is spread out. Its not a time for plays, but a time for basic give and go execution. Overload the extended zone. Pass and cut to open areas, get the ball back and then knock down your shots. Do that and the press will stop and drop back to the conventional zone to stop the bleeding. Remember the defense is assuming the larger risk by extending the defense. Don't play into their hands by being overly deliberate and predictable. Pass and cut; pass and shoot.


Email:
shoisson@attbi.com
Response Type:
Date:
22 Nov 2002

Question

I am mentoring a sixth grader as part of a career investigation project. I am looking for resources he can use to help him understand how he can best pursue a career as a basketball player and coach. I am looking for web sites, magazines or books. I am doing research myself but hope to leverage what others may have already found useful.

Answer

A career as a basketball player is a dream that is realized only by a few people that are blessed with both a basketball body and a very strong ethic and dedication. I hesitate to encourage kids to pursue basketball playing as a career. I'd rather encourage them to be the best player they can be and set their sights on participating at a collegiate level. That goal requires strong grades as well as basketball skills. The grades will sustain them no matter how the basketball pans out. Kids that presume they will be pro players and don't apply themselves to anything else (like school) achieve nothing except some playground recognition.

Coaching, however, is a career that can be attained by anyone with the desire to work hard enough to become a coach. The best way to start is to get a degree in education and be a teacher. Paid coaches are preferred and often required to be teachers. There are many certification programs available for obtaining coaching credentials. There is also the proven path of volunteering one's time as an assistant to learn the profession and meet important contacts.


Email:
ctf94@juno.com
Response Type:
Date:
22 Nov 2002

Question

what are the five positions on a basketball team? AISO PLEASE EXPLAIN TO ME THE THREE AND FIVE SECOND RULE.

Answer

Tyically a team has 5 distinct positions - 1 point guard, 2 shooting guard, 3 small forward, 4 power forward and 5 center. However, based on the team makeup and game situation, a coach may elect to have 5 guards in the game or 5 forwards. The position names and roles are very flexible. Its not at all like baseball where a pitcher, catcher and outfielder are distinct and defined roles.

Concerning the five second rule, an easy way to think of it is that a player may not have the ball in his possession more than five seconds if he is closely guarded. What's tricky is that there is a separate five second count while dribbing and while stopped. So, if a player is closely guarded in the frontcourt (the half of the floor where he is trying to score) and dribbles for 4 seconds, stops and hold the ball for 3 seconds, then passes, there is no violation.

Another five second rule is that when the referee hands you the basketball out of bounds, you have only 5 seconds to get the basketball in contact with another player on the court.

Got to www.nfhs.org and order the basketball rulebook and casebook. They're only $6.50.


Email:
cotarob@aol.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
23 Nov 2002

Question

I have a nephew that is 12 years old around 6'1 and wears size 14 shoe! I want to get him something to help his game for christmas. Since he is young, I don't want him to develop bad habits now. If you could give me some suggestions, I would appreciate it!

Answer:

I have a couple ideas. One is the Shooting video offered on my site. Its reviewed on  my front page, lower left corner. I have the video myself and it has several ways you can help your son learn to shoot properly and the cost isn't all that much, around $30. You may also consider a club membership if he doesn't already have one. I am talking about a club where members have access to a gym and a weight room and so on. In my state that runs about $100 a year.


Email:
swinney003@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
20 Nov 2002

Question

I'm doing my research paper about coaches and my question is Why women coaches today are unable to get coaching jobs with their own genders?

Answer

I think your assumption is false. Women ARE able to get coaching jobs with their own gender. I have seen that many times. If you feel they are less likely to get a job because of their gender, then maybe you have something to investigate.


Email:
hannahbanana7932@cox.net
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
20 Nov 2002

Question

Why is water considered a nutrient?

Answer

Because a nutrient (water) conveys nutriment (anything that sustains or promotes life) to the body. Water could be considered both nutrient and nutriment by that definition.

My question to you: Why would you ask a basketball coach a biology question? I wouldn't ask my Biology teacher how to shoot jump shots (unless she was also a basketball coach!).


Email:
eminemshow2006@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
18 Nov 2002

Question

how do u shoot layups and make them all the time

Answer

The quick answer is practice a lot. Our team team sets goals of making as many as one hunndred in a row. If anyone misses, we start over. Its boring, but also a test of concentration.


Email:
stonehopkins@aol.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
19 Nov 2002

Question

I'm coaching a girls team of 10-13 year olds and the team that i was given is seriously under matched against the rest of the league. I have a pretty good point guard and a decent center, but the majority of the team can't dribble or pass worth anything. I don't expect miracles from these girls but I don't want them to get humiliated. What is the best way to teach them the basics of an offense.

Answer

I had a similar team once (boys). Our offense featured a lot of pick and roll interaction near the top of the key by my point and center. The rest of the team stayed out of the way. Actually, they learned to move to open areas and spot up. When the defense began to focus on my two experienced players, they would kick the ball out to them.

I think your biggest worry may be defense. I suggest you spend a lot of practice time there and hope they learn to hold their own as a team. If you can manage to limit your opponent's scoring somewhat, you may have a chance for your two experienced players to make enough points to win.


Email:
fischer315@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
16 Nov 2002

Question

What is the length from the freethrow line to the basline, and the thrre-point line to the basline?

Answer

The distance from the baseline to the free throw line is 19 feet. The distance from the baseline to the three point line has an infinite number of answers because you didn't specify where on the three point line to measure to. The answer could be anywhere from 0 to 24' 6".


Email:
Rodney9852002@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
12 Nov 2002

Question

Hi, am Rodney and am 5"11, and my dream is be able to slam dunk on anybody there is in front of me but the problem is, I can't jump high like I want it. Is there any way you think I can exercise so I could Jump higher. Please answer me soon because, I would like to fulfill my dream, Dunking on others is my dream I would like to achieve it.

Answer

Rodney, it's great to have a dream, but I wish you were dreaming about being a great all around basketball player. Dunking is such an exhibition thing. A couple years ago, we picked up a kid for out JV team because he was amazingly athletic. He could dunk about any way you could imagine. But, he couldn't play basketball. He just didn't know how. All season, he never really got a chance to dunk.

If you want to jump that high, you will need to work out big time. I have recently received the jumpsole program which I plan to test on my old self. You can click on the banner on my front page to check it out. They have whole exercise regimen to follow. See what you think.


Email:
makavelixl47@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
13 Nov 2002

Question

ok well iam recovering from a ankel injury and before i got hurt i was a good jumper i weight 185 and iam like almost 6' and i could almost dunk but since my ankle is going through rehab i wanted to improve my jump shot and 3 pt shot and i was wondering if you have any drills i should do to help me work on my shot? i play ball like at least 3 times a week now b/c of my ankle but i need to inprove my shots. if you have any ideas they would be greatly apprechated! Allen

Answer

Last year one of my players missed a few weeks due to a similar injury. While it is very important to allow the injured part time to heal, it is also important to keep exercising in a safe way. My player decided to work on shooting. He couldn't shoot jumpshots, but he could practice free throws and threes. He shot a lot. He shot so much that he started practicing shooting left hand shots, too. He got pretty good. By the time he could play again, he had some new offensive tools to use. I recommend you do spot shooting. By that I mean picking a location and shooting a large number of shots and keeping track of your success rate. Move from station to station, shooting several shots (like 50). After a while, these places will be locked in your muscle memory. But, do not strain your ankle in any way. If it hurts, stop. Do not practice in pain or your recovery will take much longer.


Email:
SLIMSHADY819@AOL.COM
Response Type:
Date:
11 Nov 2002

Question

WHAT ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS TO SHOOT A PERFECT FADEAWAY JUMPSHOT

Answer

I don't teach a fadeaway. Its more important for my guys (they're usually about 14-15 years old) to learn more fundamental shots. However, when I play, I'll use a fadeaway sometimes, especially if posted up in the short corner with my back to the basket, or near the blocks.

When you have your back to the basket, plan your move around the pivot foot you want to use. Stick your butt out or lean back. What you want is a bump. The contact will give you a moment and a little space. Then pivot and when your toes are pointing to the basket, jump up high and slightly back. The ball should be high over your head. You need a high release point and a high arcing shot. Be balanced and facing the basket. If you shoot too soon and are twisted, the shot is much more difficult. Make sure you can shoot comfortably with your arms held very high. If you can't, there is no point in shooting a fadeaway. The purpose is too shoot over a taller player/good shot blocker and you need good fundamental form as a base. Use the backboard if you have a decent angle.

OK, watch out for these errors. Don't jump too far backwards, just a little. All you want is a litte more room for your shot. Don't increase the difficulty much. If the shot is too hard, you're better off passing. Don't try the shot if there is someone in position behind you as you shoot that can block your shot from behind. Just pivot, square and shoot - don't take an extra step.

If you make a couple fadeaway shots, repeat the move but fake the shot. The shot blocker may be desperate now. As he lunges outward, you can lean forward under his shoulder and hopefully draw a foul as you bank it in.


Email:
viper_football88@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
09 Nov 2002

Question

who it may concern:

How far away from the basket is the free-throw line?
sincerely
the questioner

Answer

Well, its 4 feet from the baseline to the backboard and then 15 feet to the free throw line, and the basket is 18 inches across. So, the answer is either 15 feet or 13 feet 6 inches depending from which part of the basket you are measuring.


Email:
mattjackson2002@yahoo.co.uk
Response Type:
Date:
07 Nov 2002

Question

could you give me an example of an easy offencive play againgst a man to amn defence involving screening?

Answer

Sure... just look in the topic menu on my site (upper right hand corner) for an article called Easy Offensive Sets and take your pick. These are offenses I have used for 11-12 year old teams and they work well for older teams that do not have much time for practice.


Email:
asimmy20@aol.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
05 Nov 2002

Question

Do you have info on shooting left handed layups

Answer

Oddly, no. Thank you for the idea and for pointing out the oversight. I plan to write one within a day or two and will send you another email.


Email:
ian.veltman@au.abb.com
Response Type:
Date:
05 Nov 2002

Question

Dear Sir / Madam,

I have a 12 year old child and in the process of installing a basketball ring on a wall at home. Can you please tell me what is the appropriate height for the ring should be installed for this age. I know that the standard height is 10 ft.

Thanks

Ian

Answer

I think 12 year olds are ready for the ten foot basket. I wouldn't lower it unless it was for kids at the fourth grade level or younger. Besides, if you are attaching it to your house, you don't want to be relocating it a little later on anyway. Hopefully, your driveway is flat. If it slopes, you may consider mounting it a little lower so the mid range shots look normal.


Email:
pasqu5@aol.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
05 Nov 2002

Question

I was asked to help coach basketball (with 8 year old kids) and i need to know how to 'set a pick'. can i get instructions on how to do this? Your help is much appreciated.

Answer

Thanks for your question to the Coach's Notebook. I think screening is a bit advanced for 8 year olds, but you may have success with it if you keep real simple. The main idea ideas I would want to get across are:

  1. The screener must establish and stay in position
  2. The person who will benefit from the screen has the responsibility to bring the defender to the screen

Here is an excerpt from my article, "Screens" that you can find in the topic menu of my website:

The driver must cause the defender to move into screen. Two common faults are that the dribbler goes so wide around the screen that the defender follows without impediment or, the dribbler drives to the wrong direction - not to the side the screener set up - and again the defender follows the ball without impediment.

Once the defender makes contact with the stationary screener, the screener must pivot so that he is back to back with the defender, preventing the defender from following his man. Upon contact, the offense will probably be on one forearm or the other. Lean on that forearm enough to take the weight off the foot on that side. Let your forearm slide down some to lower your center of gravity. Then you can pivot easier to seal him out as well as know exactly where he is. The offensive player will have a difficult time going anywhere once you pin him. Another concept I've seen taught in this situation is to pivot and "sit" on the offensive player's leg. I have had screens set on me and been sat upon. Works good.

At this point the screener's defender will usually switch to guard the dribbler. If so, the offense has created an imbalance in its favor. The dribbler is now guarded sufficiently, but due to the switch the other defender has lost his basic position of being between the basket and the person he responsible to guard. The screener has a clear path to the basket.


Email:
theaguy10@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
02 Nov 2002

Question

how far is it from the base line to the free throw line (ft or inches)

Answer

Well, its 4 feet from the baseline to the backboard and then 15 feet to the free throw line, so your answer is 19 feet.


Email:
thevarg@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
04 Nov 2002

Question

Coach,

First off, great site. The most informative resource I've found, and certainly has made coaching travel basketball the past 3 years much easier. I've recommended it to all of my fellow coaches.

Question: What is the proper manner/stance/position for "fronting" a defender in the post?

I've had great success defending the post from the side with a body-part in the passing lane (especially when aggressively defending the ball and denying away from the ball), however, this method of defending the post is substantially less effective when working against an offensive player with a significant height advantage.

I've also taught my guards to double-down if I think the situation warrants it, but a talented big man will expose you even more in those situations, passing to the open guard.

I've found some drills on defending the post on this site, but could use some clarification on the positioning.

Thanks in advance!

Answer

Thanks for the kind words. They are appreciated.

First of all, you will always be at a serious disadvantage guarding a significantly taller opponent near the basket. There is no solution for that. If the tall post is a good passer, too, its twice as bad. The only way to get the advantage back on your side is if the big player moves away from the basket and it may be difficult to make that happen. I will assert that the shorter player will have a better chance fronting a taller post than playing behind because he can be an effective pass deterrent. Once the big guy has the ball, all you can do is get a hand in his face, box out and try not to foul.

Fronting the post has two main advantages. One, it makes it harder to pass to the post and many teams won't even try it if they see a defender directly in the passing lane. Two, the lob pass over the fronting defender can be batted away or intercepted by the other post defender who should be watching for it. This is a difficult pass if the passer is being guarded aggressively.

As far as positioning, if your post defender can get a foot in the key, he should be directly in front of the post. If the post moves further out, the defender should play more to the side with a hand in the passing lane. If the post goes out to the perimeter, then just play your normal positioning.

As far as stance, I recommend constant contact, either by leaning slightly or maintaining hand contact. Since the defender has a back to the post, without touch he will lose track of him. Keep the knees bent enough that a quick jump is possible to bat away a pass. If your defender stands too straight, the bigger post will move him out of his way anyhow.

Lastly, guarding the post is a team effort. You need to hassle the passer and another defender needs to be lurking behind the post.

Here are some comments from Chalk Talk on this topic:

DEFENDING THE LOW POST

Why front the post?


Email:
claster@fmcfw.org
Response Type:
Date:
29 Oct 2002

Question

Does anyone have some simple ways for me to teach a match-up zone out of a 1-2-2 set.


Email:
robertbrecht@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
29 Oct 2002

Question

Coach,

I am a 7th grade boys basketball coach. My team is usually pretty successful, but this year there is a problem. I have 17 boys out for basketball, and the goal for sports at our school is participation. I want everyone to play, but the bottom 6 boys are horrible. What should I do? With so many boys, I don't see how everyone can get quality playing time this year.

Answer

You are correct. Everyone will not be able to obtain quality playing time. In our middle schools, everyone must play, and you may see 40 kids on a team. Their solution is to divide thekids into groups of five and rotate the groups. To me, it doesn't worth playing or coaching. Your choices are either split the team into two or announce cuts down to your maximum team roster size, say 12. Basketball isn't like smoe other sports, like cross country running, where there more the merrier. If yo udecide to cut, get support from your administration, announce it early, and run a fair tryout. Sorry there is no painless solution.


Email:
lemens16@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
29 Oct 2002

Question

what problems might develop for a basketball team made of 5 superstars?

Answer

Playing time ... for your bench. How will you rotate the rest of the kids in? I have seen teams like your's where the season ends and the team can barely field a team because the bench has quite and one of the stars is hurt, grounded or whatever. What about teaching team basketball? Will the five starts vie for glory? I have seen other talent-laden team dissolve into a playground 1:5 offenses that made them beatable. And how about the star's parents? What are their expectations? Maybe each will feel their child should be favored. Well, you asked for potential problems. These are good ones to avoid. Good luck.


Email:
babyc852003@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
01 Nov 2002

Question

hello, I want to ask some questions about coaching basketball. I am a young high school student and I am doing coaching for my senior project. And I need some tips on how to keep my own team under control without them disobeying me and how to put my own plays together and where else I can get some tips and drills from.


Email:
kjell11b@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
17 Oct 2002

Question

hey dad, i dont have a calling card so u guys should give me a call today or whenever. its nothing big, i just want to check in. 509-235-4476 later

Nice to hear from you, son.


Email:
greghead33@go.com
Response Type:
Date:
18 Oct 2002

Question

Hello, it is Greg Slade againat Palmdale Highschool, doing a project requireing a research paper. I would like to ask a couple of questions regarding coaching styles. Do you think the "run and gun", style makes the game more exciting than playing the half court game?, and if so do you think it causes more winning than losing? if u could get back to me asap it would be great. thanks.

Email sent 10/19/02.


Email:
mhammers@new.rr.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
19 Oct 2002

Question

Hello Coach, I coach a 5th grade tournament basketball team. I have one guard that was having a hard time last year making good passes. I challenged him to improve his dribbling in hopes that he would have more time to look around and see who's open. His dribbling has improved a lot but he will still pull up and pass to a guy with a defender right on him. I want desperately to help this boy. Do you have any tips? Thanks, Mike Hammers

Answer

I have had similar problems with guards on my last two teams. The main problems came down to three things: dribbling with their head down, passing up the first open pass and getting rattled. The first two are fixable. You can do dribbling drills tha require the ballhandler to change direction or initiate a move based on a visual cue from the coach. This forces them to keep looking up. The second problem is just a bad habit based on a reluctance to give up the ball until they are forced to and that usually means a rushed, poor decision. I want my guards to pass to the first open man as they bring the ball up court and then get the ball back. I get really frustrated when they dribble until they turn the ball over. You may decide to have a safety follow the ball up court so there is always an escape. About getting rattled, that needs time and experience to ovecome.If your practices are very competitive in nature, it will speed the progress of the guards learning to cope with pressure.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
23 Oct 2002

Question

teach me how to get better in basketball

Answer

The answer to your question is the same as it would be if you wanted to get better at ice skating or to get better grades. Study, practice and then test yourself. You can study by reading about, watching and thinking about basketball. You can listen and learn from people who have more experience than you. You can practice anywhere there is a hoop or a place to dribble. Join a team and test your skills in competition.


Email:
minkbrookcamp@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
24 Oct 2002

Question

hi I coach a junior varsity high school girls bball team. thinking of running a high/ low set. do you have an early entry set off of transition. thanks k. daley

Answer

No, but I will soon. We are going to install an early entry this season with my JV guys. I'll diagram and explain it then. Thanks for the topic idea.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
24 Oct 2002

Question

im looking for pictures of full court press defenses

Answer

Look at the article "Implementing a Press" and you will find diagrams of the presses I run


Email:
kjell11b@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
25 Oct 2002

Question

here are my schools starting and ending dates, Jan 6 - Jun 12 so now you can get the airline tickets later brett


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
08 Oct 2002

Question

Hello I'm Coach Sam Harris of Crossland High School (4A) in Temple Hills Maryland. I am looking for a Christmas basketball tournament for my team to participate in between December 26- Jan1. We need 2 - 3 games. We have a 300 mile radius outside of Maryland. Please contact us ASAP if you or any tournament you know need a team. Thank you

Coach Harris 443-928-3170 301-449-1888 Please call.


Email:
pure_pnt_guard@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
09 Oct 2002

Question

hi coach! I am a 5"7' soph. in japan playng for the basktball team in tokyo. I play the one, but im having a hard time leading our team. If u have the time, please teach me how to become a clear/positive point guard which will stay calm at all times and how i should work on it. thank you! alex g

Answer

You already know the answer about being a leader - staying calm and positive. The point guard position is special in that it's main goal is to score using all five players. Once your teammates understand that you are working to help them succeed, they'll gladly give you the ball and work to get open. The worst thing a pg can do is make choices that are too risky such as taking poor shots or making careless passes. Look for your own shot as a last resort, but when you have it, shoot it. Not shooting at all hurts your team because your defender will sag off and help guard your teammates. You can work on this every time you step on a court, practice or game. Good luck.


Email:
oneyearm@uni.edu
Response Type:
Date:
13 Oct 2002

Question

Maybe I missed it but have you ever thought of putting up some info on the matchup zone defense. I didnt see anything here but again I could have missed it.

Answer

Nope - but it is a good idea for an article. Thanks.


Email:
sallie1566@bartlett.k12.tx.us
Response Type:
Date:
14 Oct 2002

Question

Do you have some good practice drills for shooting 3's?

Answer

If you have someone to help you, work on approaching the perimeter, catching the pass, pivoting to face the basket, shooting then moving to a new spot and repeat the process. If you are having trouble with any of these parts, practice them individually. Make sure you can catch the pass and pivot using the foot closest to the basket to get into your shooting position. A lot of players do not shoot well because of this fundamantal element. If you are alone, you can toss the ball up, let it bounce, catch it and shoot the three. You can also use a chair as a dummy defender. Read the article written by Tom Nordland and posted on the front page of this site.


Email:
klineker@telus.net
Response Type:
Date:
15 Oct 2002

Question

sorry about bugging you, I have a question about zone defences and other plays. Where would I find diagrams or plays on the internet I looked every where thks. p.s I'm talking about basketball thank you so much!!!!!!!! Zig

Answer

I like questions from coaches - that's why this feature is here. Look in the topic menu for articles on defense and plays. There are several here with diagrams. Then, look at the links page. Many of my peers have diagrammed plays to help you.


Email:
beeballman@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
16 Oct 2002

Question

I coach a 9-10year old team. they are very good players for there age. I have a big scrimmage coming up. How would you suggest that I coach them through the scrimmage? Just curious. Thanks!

Answer

I believe that scrimmaging should be controlled, not just a situation where you throw the ball out there and let them play. You should have them play 5:5 but using the same offense and defensive plan that you have been working on in practice. When they get out of the plan, stop the scrimmage and correct them. You will likely see several more things to work on later, so take notes as they play. When my tream scrimmages, it is to practice specific parts of the game, like our half court trap defense/offense. Sometimes I allow only certain game elements to keep them focused like only taking one shot or only allowing shots after the ball is passed to the post - that kind of thing.


Email:
CuzzyT@AOL.com
Response Type:
Date:
03 Oct 2002

Question

I work at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Knoxville, in Knoxville, Tennessee and we're planning on having our first ALL star basketball team which will play in the city league here in town. The question I have is, How will I run a try out? I've coached little league team plenty of years but I've never done a try out before therefore, i will need some pointers on have to run one. Could you send me an email of example schedule of a try out or send me some ideas I can do doing this try out time.

Thanks, Tomere T. Clark

Answer

I don't have a schedule for tryouts, but I can offer some suggestions:

  1. Get some help. Ideally you have 1 person in charge of registration. That includes identifying everyone who is there. You need a list, of course, and contact info, and some means of identifying who's who - like numbered bibs or something. Then you need 4-5 volunteers, like some of the league coaches to help run the show.
  2. Organize a series of stations that isolate a skill type. Those could include defensive footwork, layups, passing, jump shots, dribbling and rebounding. 5-10 minutes is plenty of time for each station. Your assistants should man a station and keep a 1-5 rating card that scores every player. Of course, you should meet with them beforehand and discuss criteria.
  3. Start with some conditioning. Watch for kids who quit easily.
  4. Have some scrimmage time when all kids play equal minutes.
  5. Have your committee meet and then announce your picks.

Another concept I have seen work well is having all the kids in the league vote. You provide a ballot listing all players. Let each player pick his top 20 (even if you are only choosing 10). The 20 votes is good because most kids vote for teammates. The extra votes will make it easy to nominate players from other teams, too. The advantages to kids voting are that the parents of kids who don't make it can't complain about you and you also do not have to hold a tryout at all.


Email:
yuensir@netvigator.com
Response Type:
Date:
03 Oct 2002

Question

I am a secondary school teacher, leading the boy's basketball team. Our school will meet some strong team soon. The opponent used to play 1-2-1-1 defense to press their opponents. So, how should we plan our offensive play from our backcourt to get rid of their 1-2-1-1?

Thanks a lot

Answer

The 1211 is a good press, especially against young teams that may have trouble passing very far. It is essentially a diamond with a safety in the back. The goal is for the first defender to steer the ball to the side and close with a trap. The way to counter any press is to place your offense where the defense isn't. In this case, you counter a 1211 with a 212. What you want is an overload of your players on one side of the floor. If you outnumber them in a given area, someone should be open, right? So, with a 212 approach, you outnumber their point man. You can go to the side of the floor and still have a safe pass back. The target you really want is the center person - the 1 of the 212. As you bring the ball up one side, the defense will begin to shift. Hopefully, you can get the ball to that middle man. If you do then he/she can look downcourt and see your next 2vs1 mismatch and hit one of them. If the defense does a good job covering your center person, use that safe pass back and drive up the other side of the floor. The defense will shift and you may get another look to the center.

The point is, with patience you can overload the defense, reverse the ball and gradually get upcourt. Chances are the defense will make mistakes, like allowing the center to be open, and you could get easy buckets from that.

Here are the DON'Ts:

  1. Don't put your head down and drive up the side
  2. Don't make long, wild passes
  3. Don't panic or rush
  4. If they score, don't waste time and let them set up. (Read the newest article I wrote on fast breaks for some extra tips.)
  5. Don't let the ball stop. Keep it moving with short crisp passes.

Good luck!


Email:
naknekians@chugach.net
Response Type:
Date:
04 Oct 2002

Question

I am wondering where we can get a list of the team my son is supposed to be on for youth basketball from the YMCA Anchorage. I can't access their website at all - can you forward me to the right people? Thanks

Answer

You better call them. They used to have a web page, but it was never very current or interactive. The number is 1-907-563-3211.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
22 Sep 2002

Question

what are positions played on the court

Answer

Usually the positions are point guard, shooting guard, small forward, power forward and center. The positions are not mandatory. You can play all guards if you want (or have no choice).


Email:
danny34football
Response Type:
Date:
25 Sep 2002

Question

give me plays for football

Answer

Sorry, this is a basketball coaching site. I have no football plays.


Email:
ag1jg2@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
29 Sep 2002

Question

What is the best defense against a young man who is 14 yrs old, and he simply dominates smaller guys who are trying to guard him?

Answer

Prevention is the best cure. Pressure the ball handler and keep someone between the star and the ball so passes are as difficult as possible. Make someone else on their team try to beat you.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
02 Oct 2002

Question

do sport strategies affect the results of the game

Answer

Teams exist so they can work together rather than individually. To work together, teammates need a plan. That plan is your strategy. The outcome of a sporting contest is usually the result of which team best executes their stragety. So, the answer to your question is, "yes".


Email:
ggerads@ci.bloomington.mn.us
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
19 Sep 2002

Question

Steve, you've been a tremendous help in the past...a couple of quick questions.

6th grade girls basketball

1. At what point on the court should you teach your point guard to make the first past in running your continuous offense?

2. What should you teach girls at this age with respect to creating enough space to get a shot off? On a related note at this age and gender do you promote jump shots or more of a set shot?

Answer

1. The way I teach it to my team is to say that the offense starts when the ball gets to the wing. The defense may put all kinds of wrinkles on your offense pattern, especially if they know where you need to pass. In fact, A good defensive ploy is to simply take the normal point to wing pass away by over playing it. Many teams have rehearsed a standard entry to their offense and if that pass doesn't happen, they can't get started. So, start the offense when the ball gets to the wing. That way, the point guard has a lot of freedom about when to pass. If the pass isn't possible, she can simply dribble to the wing and exchange places her. You still got the ball to the wing, but without a pass. Now its up to the point guard to get that pass in to the post (or back out to the new point) to start your offense.

2. There are lots of ways to create space - cutting to get the ball, using screens, penetrating dribbles and so on. These are crucial skills for all young players and I would recommend working on all of them using breakdown drills. In the games, the girls should watch for and recognize the opportunities they learned in these drills to decide when they are open enough to shoot. A high quality shot is defined as one that is within the player's range and that can be taken without undue pressure from the defense. In the drills we run, the players soon learn to anticipate when they will likely have created enough space (coming off a screen for example) for an open shot. Then, when they receive the ball, they are mentally and positionally prepared to shoot. In your drills, help the girls with the anticipation aspect. Knowing the shot is coming is a good motivation to work hard to get open. They will make mistakes at first - shooting under pressure and being off balance, but they'll improve with encouragement.

At their age, I would recommend getting open enough to take a good set shot. Those shots will be available if they run their offense well, and be even more available if they run downcourt as fast as possible. I suggest watching the players to see who is physically ready to shoot jumpers. If you think they are ready, introduce the techniques. What you should stay away from is players forcing jump shots just because they can get them off. You still need to maintain a good shooting percentage. In the high school girls games I watch, some players use a jumper, but most of the baskets come off of fast breaks and wide open set shots after the defense breaks down.


Email:
res0mze4@verizon.net
Response Type:
Date:
15 Sep 2002

Question

My 15 year old daughter started lifting weights in school about a month ago. In the last couple of weeks her game has been off. Her shots are all way off. I was wondering if this is related, it is the only thing I can think of that has changed. Any suggestions? Thanks

Answer

Certainly, undertaking a weight lifting program will affect a person's shooting, especially when they first start lifting. The body will be making rapid adjustments for a while. The most noticeable difference will be immediately after a workout. Usually, basketball players don't lift heavy weights during the season. For girls, however, weight training is a good idea as they are much more prone to knee injury than boys and the training can help prevent that. But - I think its better done in the off season. Stick with the coach's wishes, though. In time, her shot will come back. She needs to keep shooting, but not right after a workout. Wait until her body has recovered.


Email:
gumanhong@sohu.com
Response Type:
Date:
06 Sep 2002

Question

Hi, coaches, I know this question is not about coaching, but I have friends and players who are very interested in it: Would the following changes be able to decrease the average height of today's basketball players? 1, enlarge the paint area. 2, enlarge the size of the court. 3, add a four point line. 4, make some rule changes to make it easier for small guys to guard big post players.

gu from china

Answer

I don't think altering the geometry of the game will significantly change the game to remove the heighth advantages, and frankly, why would you want to? Being tall helps, but an athlete needs to be able to run and execute skills. There is a place for smaller players in basketball if they can handle the ball, pass and shoot ... and play defense.


Email:
Tag2289
Response Type:
Date:
09 Sep 2002

Question

Who went to the Navy then Coached Collage Men's basketball?

That decribes several college coaches. Trick question?


Email:
MugMish55@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
10 Sep 2002

Question

I would really love to know how far it is from the base line to the free throw line!

Answer

According to the rules, the backboard should be 4 feet from the baseline and the freethrow line 15 feet from the backboard - so, that adds up to 19 feet base line to free throw line.


Email:
guyevans@wrestlingheroes.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
11 Sep 2002

Question

Hey coach, thanks for the great answer last time you gave me on the fadeaway jumpshot. I have two other questions, if that's okay.

1) What are the keys for mental preperation before playing basketball, and how can you increase focus during games?

2) As a guard who likes to play in the post, what are the fundamental moves to use on a defender?

Thanks for your time, Guy Evans, Wales, UK.

Answer

1) The first key is to actually have a plan for what you intend to do. Some people just "psych up", but that is purely emotional. A better plan is to mentally prepare for guarding a particular opponent, executing certain moves you have been working on, shooting the ball well, performing your role correctly in the team defense, etc. I teach my kids to think about the upcoming game the night before we play by visualizing the things I just mentioned. The next day at school, those same thoughts should be in the back of their mind. By game time, if they are mentally prepared, they can play more instinctively instead of thinking as they play and losing their edge. The worst thing to do is simply show up with your mind on something irrelevant. The mentally prepared players will rip you up.

2) If a guard posts up against a big guy, the main advantage may be quickness. If you have room, feel the contact (we talked about that last mail), then drop step, spin and go for the reverse layup. You may need the extra room and the net to help protect against the big guy blocking from behind.

If you are against a smaller player, you might feel a couple bumps, then spin and use a power layup on the side of the basket closest to you.

If you don't have a good chance to score, kick it out.


Email:
Teshawna03@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
11 Sep 2002

Question

what is your salary for coaching pre-k - 12?

Answer

Coaches here make about $2-3,000 depending on the length of the season. Its a stipend, not a salary. Varsity coaches make a little more. And, this is only for high school sports. I believe any coaches of younger kids are volunteers.


Email:
wades4@optonline.net
Response Type:
Date:
04 Sep 2002

Question

I am in search of a simple motion offense for 5th and 6th grade girls that will be easy for me to understand and easy for them to execute. My concern is not in following patterns but how to encourage them to take shot opportunities that are not part of the scheme. Do you have any suggestions?

Answer

Look in the topic menu for the article, Easy Offensive Sets, and you'll find some very basic patterns that set the stage for motion style offenses. The secret to teaching motion is to perfect the games within the game. Those are the pick and roll and the give and go. We spend a lot of time doing 2:2 breakdowns. You also need to cover the basic matter of getting open for a pass. Many young teams work on a pattern, then in a game can't run it because the wings can't get open. Other details are passing the ball to a post and how to set screens. The elements must be first practiced outside of an offensive pattern, then the players will understand how they are combined into a play. If the elements are done correctly, the play will actually work. Choose a very simple pattern so you have time to concentrate on these fundamental things.


Email:
andy@hoopskills.com
Response Type:
Date:
03 Sep 2002

Question

Hello Coach, I am actually contacting you because I would love to set up a link exchange with you. I am the owner of www.hoopskills.com. We offer a wide selection of basketball training aids and I get many visitors that would be interested in your site.

I would love to set up a link on my "hoop links" page to your site, if you would be willing to set up a link to us on your "coaching links" page or wherever you see fit.

Please think it over and let me know what you think and I'll get started setting up your link.

Andy Louder 801-789-4804 www.hoopskills.com

Answer

I like your site. It is very well presented and you have a nice array of product offerings. I wish you success with it. I added you to my links page.


Email:
auzzie4@earthlink.net
Response Type:
Date:
03 Sep 2002

Question

I understand there is a link on the web for finding out how to hold an evaluation forum for players. We've never held an evaluation before and want to do it right the first time. Thanks.

Kim Rogers Riverside, CA

Answer

I have an evaluation form on this site, but I see you are looking for something more in depth. I'll keep an eye out for you, but don't have anything immediate to offer you. Sorry.


Email:
guyevans_2000@yahoo.co.uk
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
31 Aug 2002

Question

Hey coach, I would like to know the fadeaway jumpshot. What are the fundamentals of this shot? I realise whilst the fadeaway isn't a pure basketball shot and is rarely coached, but I've been encouraged to try and develop one so I would be very grateful if you answered this question.

Thanks for your time, Guy Evans, Wales, UK.

Answer

I don't teach a fadeaway. Its more important for my guys (they're usually about 14-15 years old) to learn more fundamental shots. However, when I play, I'll use a fadeaway sometimes, especially if posted up in the short corner with my back to the basket, or near the blocks.

When you have your back to the basket, plan your move around the pivot foot you want to use. Stick your butt out or lean back. What you want is a bump. The contact will give you a moment and a little space. Then pivot and when your toes are pointing to the basket, jump up high and slightly back. The ball should be high over your head. You need a high release point and a high arcing shot. Be balanced and facing the basket. If you shoot too soon and are twisted, the shot is much more difficult. Make sure you can shoot comfortably with your arms held very high. If you can't, there is no point in shooting a fadeaway. The purpose is too shoot over a taller player/good shot blocker and you need good fundamental form as a base. Use the backboard if you have a decent angle.

OK, watch out for these errors. Don't jump too far backwards, just a little. All you want is a litte more room for your shot. Don't increase the difficulty much. If the shot is too hard, you're better off passing. Don't try the shot if there is someone in position behind you as you shoot that can block your shot from behind. Just pivot, square and shoot - don't take an extra step.

If you make a couple fadeaway shots, repeat the move but fake the shot. The shot blocker may be desperate now. As he lunges outward, you can lean forward under his shoulder and hopefully draw a foul as you bank it in.


Email:
eok20@stargate.net
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
02 Sep 2002

Question

Hi, I desperately need a coaches opinion. Last year, when I was a sophmore in high school, I only played JV (junior varisty). I also wasn't the biggest hustler and didn't play my best all of the time because of problems I had with my teamates and JV coach. Because of those things the varsity coach didnt give me a shot at the varsity team and gave up on me (he wouldnt help me out at all with my game). In the beginning of summer he got together a summer team including some freshman that he scouted to play in a summer league. He didn't ask me. Over the summer I changed my attitude and my game completely. I worked very hard and became an incredibly better player. I fear though that I won't get a good look this year from my coach and may get cut. I want to talk to him and tell him how I got better and how Im more committed, etc. but I dont know what to say or how to do it. Any advice would be GREATLY apreciated. Thank you!

Answer

You know, freshman and sophomores often make unfortunate first impressions on the head coach. Imagine you are a head coach and have several good players to choose from. Its real easy to cross off people who don't hustle or who show poor attitudes and concentrate your efforts on the rest. In my experience, the 9th and 10th grades are years where players learn to grow up as it sounds like you've done. Your coach may understand that. You MUST talk to him or he will never have a reason to change his mind.

Here is what is suggest:

  1. Apologize for your previous non-hustle and attitude. This will make a very good impression as it takes a mature person to apologize.
  2. Ask him to take a new look and see your improvement
  3. Promise to always to your best in the future
  4. Promise to do whatever he says (and then really do it)
  5. Offer to help the team in any way you can, even as a stat person or by fundraising, for example. I know you really want to play, but an offer like this would prove how badly you want to be on the team.
  6. Ask him how you can improve your chances
  7. Write back to me later and tell me how it goes.

I hope you make it.


Email:
littleb_1204yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
25 Aug 2002

Question

i am doing a trivia puzzle for my honors FST class and one of the questions is : what is the number of ways to score one hundred points in basketball so if you could please help me answer this questions. thanks

Answer

I thought you were taking an HONORs class. Where does the honor come in if I tell you the answer? And ... what happens if I don't know the answer and then you get it wrong?


Email:
Bigsky4me@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
25 Aug 2002

Question

My question is about clinics for coaching basketball. I am going to assist a varsity girls basketball coach. I would like to find a clinic that is geared for getting new coaches started. Thank you.

Mark Clark

Answer

Hmmm... I suggest checking with your local colleges and the state high school athletic association. You'll probably find some accredited courses that will benefit you and help you meet some good coaching contacts as well. Otherwise, check my links page for other coaching websites (after you read mine, of course!).


Email:
balla4life88@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
26 Aug 2002

Question

What does it take to be a truly great coach?

Answer

To be a truly great basketball coach you need truly great basketball players. I heard Pat Riley of the Miami Heat/LA Lakers speak once. Someone asked him the difference between a good team and a great team. He said, "Magic Johnson". The fact is that the game belongs to the players. There are many wonderful coaches out there who never get noticed because their teams are good - perhaps beautifully coached - but, just good. There are many not so wonderful coaches who are blessed with above average talent, and after winning, have the arrogance to claim the credit. That's wrong.

I think the best you can do is care about your players more than yourself. Dedicate all your efforts to make them better - as players, as a team, and as people. If, at the end of your season, you know you have done all you can, then you are a success. You will need to constantly educate yourself and be willing to change as the team requires, but if you are truly dedicated, you be doing that as second nature.


Email:
lilsimms1228@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
26 Aug 2002

Question

How many years of college do have to go to to be a college basketball coach

Answer

let me answer your question on two levels. One, how many years of college do you need to be a basketball coach (not necessarily a college coach)?

None. Of course, lack of a college education will make it difficult to get a head coaching job in a high school or college; impossible in some places. But you can be a basketball coach at the recreational level with no prerequisites. If you want to be an volunteer assistant to a high school team, it is unlikely anyone would care about your educational credentials. The main thing is to be able to offer the kids sound basketball fundamentals, character building and leadership. Coaching is so much more than running the team at game time ... so much more.

If you have a degree, the chances of qualifying for a school job are reasonable. Best of all, if you become a teacher, your chances are excellent. The next best situation is having your degree and working in the school system.

OK, How many years of college to be a college basketball coach?

I would think you would be expected to have a masters degree and be a part of the college staff. Its very likely you would be expected to teach as well. If you have a particular school in mind, I suggest you contact their basketball program and ask if you could volunteer and learn the ropes. Degree or not, without a huge reputation or inside contacts, you're not likely to land a college coaching job.


Email:
GRJJE@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
22 Aug 2002

Question

We have a dilemma in our youth basketball recreational league. Should a head coach and his assistant be allowed to have their children on their team if they meet the age requirements? Some say this enables a coach to stack a team with better players. Others say they want to pick an assistant before a draft because so many of the parents don't have time or don't desire to help out. Please help.

Answer

Should a coach be allowed to have his own kid on his team? Of course! Think of the family's logistical problems if that were not allowed. So, if coaches are allowed to coach their own kids, then the next question is, should we prevent certain coaches from working with certain assistant coaches because their combination of kids might be too strong? Phrased that way, you can see that it would be impossible to be fair and objective with such a rule.

I say, let the head coaches pick no more than one assistant and let the kids play for their parents. Perhaps one team will benefit more than another. But that would be the case anyway - some teams will always have more talent than others. Even if you try to draft the kids (where coaches pick one at a time) or have an administrative person or committee form the teams to make them even, it won't be perfectly fair and someone will complain.

Let nature take its course. Some of the underdogs will be better than they expect. That's what competition is all about. Remember, the main point is to provide a fun, instructive environment for the kids to play, not mollify the egos of parents wooried about their team's w/l record before the season even starts. Trying to solve this dilemma will waste your time and still not make everyone happy.

Hope that helps some and good luck with your season.


Email:
coachhop@frontiernet.net
Response Type:
Date:
21 Aug 2002

Question

Thanks for your time and help. I would like to know if there is anything that I can read or any information that you may be able to offer to help my install an offense for a parochial leagur J.V. team(5th and6th grades). I want to run screens and picks but want to make sure that I convey the concepts properly to this age group. I hope that I can do this coaching position justice. I sincerely appreciate any information that you may be able to offer me and hope that you don't mind if I email you again. I want to do this job right and hope that these kids can learn from me. I guess my main concern is to make it concise enough for them to understand and to build upon what I teach them over time. Thanks again,coach. Much appreciation for what you do. Coach Hop

Answer

Look carefully through the topic menu. You will find an article. "Easy Offensive Sets" that I used with 5th/6th graders. There are articles devoted to screening and other specific skills. Read those and feel free to email me at sjordan@alaskalife.net whenever you like.


Email:
redevill211@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
19 Aug 2002

Question

coach, I was wondering how i can improve my dribbling. I have 1 or 2 moves down, but need to work on them and learn some more. One of my friends said you answered him and could probably help me. I really hope you can help me, because all of my friends know all of my moves. THANX, Bobby

Answer

There are a couple essential things to understand about moves. It helps to rehearse some favorite skills, but these two things will take you to the next level without memorizing a long list of moves.

1. Make sure you can use either hand without a second thought. If your left hand is a little weaker, then dribble with it all the time until it is like instinct. Once your hands have equal skill, then your brain can take over and you can move as a reflex, not a practiced maneuver.

2. Have a plan. You probably always know where you want to go. That's your advantage over the defender. He doesn't know exactly where - or when - you are going to go. So, make him think you will be going left when you want to go right. Use your eyes, head, body language - be a good actor. Once you learn mis-direction, you don't even need to be all that quick. Make the defense move away from where you want to go, then use that instant to go the other way.


Email:
garnerk@telus.net
Response Type:
Date:
17 Aug 2002

Question

I have a question about pivot feet. What teaching should we be giving wings in terms of receiving the ball out on the wing in terms of establishing a pivot foot and which foot should be available for the drive on the right or left side. Should it be a two foot stop and let them decide which foot? But they need to square up to the basket, so they need to pick a pivot foot?

Could you please offer me some advice on this topic.

Thanks, Coach G

Answer

Interesting question and it always sparks debate. If you go to Chalk Talk you can read what several coaches had to say about it this month.

I teach the kids to catch the ball and pivot on the inside foot so that they end up facing the basket. I see a lot of kids try to brake using their outside foot and it makes them hop or stumble. Its so much cleaner to catch the pass, brake on the inside foot, and user the forward energy to pivot to the hoop. Both feet should then be about the same distance to the hoop. If they do this right, they will still have their dribble and the ability to push off either foot.


berry_gurgin@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
11 Jul 2002

Question

Hello, Thanks so much for your web site. I have spent so much time in search for a low key site that could answer some of my questions, and I found it in yours! so THANKS! My question has to do with Coaching clinics. I live in California and am a player and fan of the game. I am now 27 and the gym that I am of a member of is buliding a new state of the art b-ball gym to instruct b-ball drills have clinics and have a city leauge and summer b-ball camps. My heart is in coaching b-ball but due to the owners request all coaches and trainers/teachers must be certified in some way. Now I have played this wonderfull game as long as I can remember . Through grade school,high school, and some collage. But now what I need is to know if there are clinics that I can attend that will certify. Like I said I live in California, so it would help if you knew any clinics in this state for coaches. I can understand the owner of the gym and where he is coming from so I hope to find some clinics that will help with the challenge

Answer

Thanks for your comments.


Email:
queenzqt88@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
09 Aug 2002

Question

can you explain to me the basics like where each position stands and stuff like that...thanx

Answer

The positions change depending on the type of offense you want to run, as well as the defensive configuration you want to use. Coaches usually look at their team and try to figure out what style will work the best. The positioning can be about anything you can imagine. The position names and numbers aren't really very important as you will need to put the kids on the floor that can help you the most whether they are all guards or all centers. Try looking at the play diagrams on the site and then read the explanations provided. They should make sense for the situation they're designed for.


Email:
coco0138@earthlink.net
Response Type:
Date:
13 Aug 2002

Question

Where do the players stand in basketball and what are the postions and numbers?

Answer

Well, the game of basketball is so dynamic that you can mix and match the numbers any way you want.

A basic way to start on offense might be:

              o
        5

3     4              2

            1

where
o is the basket
1 is the point guard
2 is the shooting guard
3 is the off guard/swing man/small forward
4 is the power forward
5 is the center


Email:
hhibamafan@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
05 Jul 2002

Question

I am coaching a team in our Boys and Girls club summer league ages 10-14... The team we are playing tomorrow just beat us last fri and thier pt guard had 30 pts he is clearly the best player in our league....but he has a good team around him as well he can score from the perimeter and create for him self off of the dribble and if we double him he dishes to the open man for a easy lay up the also have a small forward who is deadly form the outside...what defense could i use to contain him and make the other players beat me?

thanks

Michael

Answer

There's no magic defense to counter a solid team that has good shooters. Sometimes you just need to face the fact that the opponent's star is going to hurt you no matter what you do. In that case, I'd probably settle for trying to make him score from the outside and hope for the best. The worst damage is when the star makes everyone else better by setting them up for good shots. So, you might try a basic zone and keep everyone within the perimeter. Don't panic when the star knocks down some long threes and don't blame yourself when he gets 30+ points. He'd probably get them anyway.


Email:
RED@MICHAELSONAUTO.COM
Response Type:
Date:
07 May 2002

Question

I AM LOOKING FOR A GOOD VIDEO THAT WILL HELP ME COACH BASKETBALL FOR 3RD AND 4TH GRADE GROUP ANY HELP

Answer

You might try www.powerbasketball.com They offer many good videos.


Email:
sh.ong@ericsson.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
19 May 2002

Question

How do I improve my JUMPING so that I'm able to dunk ? In order to dunk, do I also need to know how to grip the ball tight ?

Answer

To improve jumping, you need to lift weights and practice jumping, of all things. How many times can you touch the bottom of the backboard in 15 seconds? Once? Twice? Work at it until you can touch it 20 times in 15 seconds. If your hands are too small, you're not going to be able to palm it. You might try cradling it against your forearm.


Email:
dustinnorton@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
17 Jun 2002

Question

Ok i got alot of big kids with few ball skills , one point guard and one average off guard , what offence and defense(s) would you run ?

Answer

I'd use a standard 3 out 2 in setup. I'd tell my big guys to either shoot (most of the time) or pass, but avoid dribbling until they get it down in practice. The guards should learn to pass to them and then MOVE, either for a handoff or to an open area for a jumper.


Email:
cut3gaNda_16@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
25 Jun 2002

Question

what is sport coaching? how to organize and manage sports?

Answer

I need more specifics to answer your question.


Email:
pms9153@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
04 Jul 2002

Question

I'm iooking for a simple offence to run against a 2 3 zone. thanks PMS

Answer

Look at my article, Basic Offensive Sets. There is an easy-to-learn zone offense that will work.


Email:
peacegirl777_22611@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
12 Apr 2002

Question

Hi, My name is Lindsay. I want to go out for the school basketball team next year but the problem is i don't know tha first thing about basketball. I mean i know the obvious stuff, but i don't know all the positions and what the jobs of those positions are. I was wondering if you could give me any information on the positions and rules. thanks loads, Lindsay

Answer

You sound like a perfect 2 guard. That's not a point guard, its the shooting guard position. You're the right size, quickness and have the shooting ability.

Here are some jobs for the shooting guard.

Help the point guard bring the ball up the floor. Don't do the dribbling, just be there to get the pass when she feels defensive pressure, then give the ball back.

Work hard to get open. Go to a wing (somewhere near the three point line, about a 45 degree angle to the basket), then get open for a pass. Ways to do that ... run to the baseline (out of bounds under the basket) and back, or go close to the basket and run around a team mate then return. Its hard work, but you'll always be open for a pass and then you can shoot.

Don't shoot every time you get the ball, just when you are nice and open.

Work really hard on defense. If your man has the ball, make her stop dribbling then get close and make it hard to pass. Don't foul. If your man doesn't have the ball, don't ever let her get a pass. Try to steal passes, not dribbles.

That's probably a good start for now. You are young and have lots of time to get better, so don't get discouraged when things don't go well. There are always good times to offset the bad. And, listen to your coach.

Good luck. I wish you well.


Email:
sunshine@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
17 Apr 2002

Question

what is the difference between man and zone in basketball?

Answer

Good question! In a man to man (m2m) defense, each player is responsible for guarding a particular opponent. There may be cases where you might trade with one of your teammates, or times when you might gang up two against one, but in general each person on your team is guarding only one person on the other team. In a zone, each defender is responsible for guarding an area of the court. When a person with the ball is in your area (no matter who the person is) you are expected to guard that player. You pretty much stay in your area, or zone, all the time you are on defense.

One good way to see if another team is playing zone is to have one of your players go from a wing position, through the defense and out the other side. If somebody follows your player, you have m2m coverage. If the defenders stay in place, its a zone.

If you have more questions, write back.


Email:
mysbasketball@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
28 Apr 2002

Question

Is it okay for coaches to hug and slap players on their bottoms? Your input is appreciated.

Answer

I don't do it. It used to be common, but coaches are moving away from having physical contact with the players. It isn't necessary and it can be very awkward, especially if the genders differ between the coach and the players. Parents have a right to object to such contact and so do the players. If the coach is asked to stop, he/she should immediately. Feelings may be hurt as the coach may have had only the best of intentions, but it's not appropriate in my opinion.

Now, basketball is a passionate game. If at the end of an emotional game, or at the end of a season, a player came to me and gave me a hug (and that has happened), I'd return it and feel pretty happy about it. But I won't initiate a hug or a slap on the rear.

In practice, I find it necessary to move players, so I tug their jersey. Last season, in the first practice, I explained to the players why I will tug onthe jersey and asked if anyone had a problem with it. No one objected, so that's the method of contact we used.


Email:
shellstar4@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
01 May 2002

Question

Hi

I am a coach of an Under 16 girls representative team in Sydney Australia and i would love to get your opinion and advice on the following question:

How would you handle a team when half the team is very committed and the other half is not. WE have the problem of some girls missing training and not playing some games as they are too busy. I feel sorry for the girls who are committed and are showing great promise as they work hard and attend every training.

WE do not have a chance to cut players as there is no one waiting in the wings to take their spot.....i can reduce court time and give them physical penalties at training but there is not much else i can think to do.

The team performance definitely suffers but its a no win situation.....if i cut some players and dont allow them to play we go to games undermanned and the girls who do play get tired and we dont have enough subs.....or i let the non committed girls play and they lack the skill and knowledge and let us down inevitably but they assist in reducing fatigue for the team as i have more players to rotate.

Girls are hard at this age when they still want to do all different sports and the way our basketball system works we dont have many choices in training times or choices in athletes!

Help!

REgards
Michelle Henstock
Norths Bears Under 16 Women
Head Coach

Answer

We have a similar problem in our smaller Alaskan schools where the student body is small yet there are many available activities that end up competing for participants. Its a great environment for the kids as they can try so many things. Its tough for a coach, or a team, that wants a higher degree of commitment to excel.

I think you need to be very pragmatic. You can't force the other half of the team to be more committed and you can't afford to cut them. In fact, punishing them with more bench time will actually be detrimental to your cause. If they aren't having fun, why should they show up at all? About the only answer is for the team to be the most important thing for them. You can do that by making it so much fun they don't want to do anything else, or help them feel that their participation is essential enough they feel more obligated to excel. For instance, if they had roles more significant than just resting the main players, maybe their interest would heighten. I used the word pragmatic earlier because you may not be able to improve this situation at all. You can still set achievable team goals so the committed girls attain a sense of success. If your players are having fun and improving, its bound to influence more future players to want to join up with you. It takes time to build a full team in a small community. But when you do, you may create a tradition the community is known for.


Email:
josean@soysolidario.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
26 Mar 2002

Question

dear coach, i would like to be in the tecnichal staff of an nba team...can you tell me if this is possible. perhaps my presentation is not as well as i would desire but i thinck i am a very good coach, and i need some foreiners experience.

can you help me....thanks...

im looking forward to hear you. josean

Answer

Anything is possible. You will need some good contacts and recommendations to help you reach your goal. Where can you work right now? You need to build a portfolio - samples of your work. You need to meet people who know people who work where you want to work. As you make friends and impress others with the quality of your work, you can ask them to recommend you to someone at a higher level. Good luck. Give yourself enough time to realize your dream. It may take a while, but you can make a lot of friends along the way.


Email:
solhot1@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
01 Apr 2002

Question

Hello!! My name is Sol, i'm from Aregntina but i'm studing in Iowa State University traying to get a Master in Physical Education, and also i"m a coach from my country. I'm really interenting to get a Cauching License here in Iowa, I would like to recieve information about the next campus around here. Thanks . I'll be waiting........SOL

Answer

Well, Sol, I am up here in Alaska, a long, long way from Iowa. To find out about nearby campus instruction, you will be better served talking to coaches who live in your area.


Email:
kjell11b@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
14 Mar 2002

Question

hey, hows it going? i guess i'm not going to ask about dunking but i was wondering if i could visit rake during my spring break. i checked the prices and they are about $128 round trip. it would be about 5 days. but i'll call you guys tomorrow to see what you think. later, brett


Email:
anaperei@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
14 Mar 2002

Question

what are the different positions in the game(basketball)?

Answer

Usually teams have a center (typically the biggest player) also referred to as the 5 position. Postions 4 and 3 are forwards, the player playing closer to the basket is the power forward and the other foward may play awayfrom th basket more and is called a small forward or a swing man. The guard roles are a little more distinctive. The point guard, position 1, is the primary ball handler and is used to bring the ball upcourt and set up the offense. Position 2 is the shooting guard who may also have excellent ballhandling skills, but is more likely to be the player most likey to take outside shots. Of course, the coach may alter these roles any way possible to best fit the talents of the team.


Email:
thehomer@inet-pc.com
Response Type:
Date:
20 Mar 2002

Question

any ideas on drills that can improve dribbling skills....i have always like the drill using chairs and weaving back and forth...how about doing that drill with two basketballs? also, what have you done to best teach the crossover drill and get some success from players, instead of the inevitable steal as they put the ball in front of the defender.?

Answer

Using two balls at once is a great idea. It forces a great deal of concentration. I ask the kids to dribble two basketballs, sometimes using alternating left-right-left dribbles or have both basketballs strike the floor at the same time. You can do the weaving drills or another fun idea is to have relay races.

For cross-overs, I like the step back and switch hands, the behind the back and the through legs cross overs. I insist that the player try to make space for protection (the step back is the safest), keep the dribble low and very firmly bounced, and always face the basket - do not turn your back to the defender. For this reason I don't teach a spin move. Too often a player gets in the habit of spinning and they always spin their favorite way. A smart defender will anticipate and steal the dribble while the back is turned. Keep the players eyes up and looking down the floor at all times. Ask them how many fingers you're holding up to check. To practice the cross over, I have them dribble down the side of the court. Right before half court (where I am waiting), I jump them, and they have to cross to avoid me. Once the reach the baseline, they come up the other side and cross over on front of the assistant coach. You can add more uncontested cross over point along the route if you wish. If all the kids have a basketball, this drill is active and fun.


Email:
mcgregor_mark@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
23 Mar 2002

Question

I need info on triangle and two defences who invented it why it started have to do a paper on it

Answer

Sorry - I don't have the information you requested. You might try these two coaching forums where many coaches will see your question:

Log on to ... http://www.worldofsports.com/mar02talk/

Or email your question to ...

basketball-coaching@yahoogroups.com  


Email:
gquezada@chsd.org
Response Type:
Date:
09 Mar 2002

Question

My 9 year old son has had 3 severe ankle sprains in the last year. Is there a particular brand, make or type of ankle brace or any other product that you can recomend? Thank you. Guillermo Quezada.

Answer

Well, the key is for your son's ankle to get stronger so that it can stand the rigors of basketball. Often a brace creates a dependency. It may be that your son needs a year of low risk exercise to let the ankle fully heal and get stronger. The last thing you want to do is foster a chronic condition for the sake of basketball. Check with a sports doctor in your area for professional advice. I'm just a coach. Your doctor may likely have a better answer.


Email:
mhammers@new.rr.com
Response Type:
Date:
05 Mar 2002

Question

I coach a 4th grade tournament basketball team. I love coaching the forwards position and have always developed good forwards and inside games. One of my weak areas is in coaching the guard position. Do you have a suggestion on where I can get educated on coaching this position. It could be a book or video. I am open for ideas. Thanks,

Answer

I am just the reverse. I think like a guard. This year I had an assistant coach who is a big guy. He could work with the post people and I could listen in and learn. You can pick up a lot listening to other coaches. You don't necessarily need to have been a guard to teach guards. As far as a specific book or video, I am sorry, but I do not have a recommendation.


Email:
dentistry@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
07 Mar 2002

Question

The 20 Drill looks great. However, it would be to the passer/screeners advantage to not do his best to help the shooter since the passer/screener can only score points for himself when he advances to the shooter position. And helping the shooter to score is lessening the passer/screeners chance of winning this competitive drill.

I am not saying that the kids are necessarily bad sports, but for some of them, the allure of winning this drill may influence how they play it. Especially when the shooter gets close to 20 points. I can see how this drill could have the added advantage of building character, but do you have any specific tips on how to make this work?

Answer

You're correct, of course. I did not see this happen when we played the game, but it could. Remedies would be to have the coach play that spot all the time. Or, you could say that the passer screener shares points with the scorer. That would motivate both to succeed.


Email:
sheepdog@aboutmontana.net
Response Type:
Date:
04 Mar 2002

Question

coach, I coach an 8th grade boys team that is trying to stay in shape for next year. I found out that half the team never played much against the 2-3 zone which is very popular in our division. What is the easiest to learn and best offense to combat this? Thanks john

Answer

Hmmm... this is similar to the question below. Once they understand overload principles, plays aren't all that necessary. However, I recommend you read the Easy Offensive Sets article and look at the play called Hi-Lo. Super easy to learn and it features an overload that follows the ball and a reversal to the weak side for a quick shot. You can run the pattern over and over until the defense breaks down. Give it a try.


Email:
Response Type:
Date:
1/15/02

Question

I need an effective half court press break against a 2-3 trapping zone.

Answer

The recipe for breaking zone presses is all the same. Put your people where they are not. Against a 2-3, you might start in a 1-2-2. Then have one of the bottom 2 guys move to the free throw line on the same side as the other bottom guy. Now you have an overload. Quick passing will exploit your numbers advantage. Another way is to simply get the ball up court as fast as you can and don't let them get set up. That is the zone's most vulnerable moment. Do not dribble, especially near traps. Once the trap begins to show, pass. Once your trapped, you're dead meat. Pass receivers should recognize the open areas on the floor created when the trap forms. It takes two defenders to make a trap. That means somebody's open. That somebody should move to the open area and call for the ball.


Email:
www.huricanes@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/16/02

Question

Thank you for this web-site. I am coaching a 5th grade girls team. The majority of the girls have never touched a basketball or even thought of being on a team. I have decided to keep things simple with a 1-3-1 offense and a 2-3 defense. This is a starter league that only consists of 6 games and very little practice time. My question is, am I on the right track?

I think your off to a great start. You're wise to keep it simple. Make sure the girls maintain good spacing in both their offense and defense. In the 2-3, the girls away from the ball are very important. They need to "cheat", sag into the key, when the ball is away and then jump out to the ball when it is on their side. Offensively, the 131 is good because you always have a scoring threat in the middle. With simple O and D, you can focus your limited practice time on ballhandling, passing and shooting. Good job.


Email:
gbingaya2001@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
1/16/02

Question

How do i get post players to score more.

Answer

There are two parts to this answer. One, make sure they get the ball often in the game. Most young teams are dominated by their guards and young guards are notoriously selfish with the ball. The main reason kids don't play post on the playground is because they get ignored. Some coaches state that no one take a shot until a big guy touches the ball and that's a good rule. When you watch your next game, see how many times your team has the ball and of those, how many times the ball is passed to a post.

The second part is to develop post play. Big man skills take time to learn. Kids that master them will always have a place to play ... assuming the guards throw them the ball. Look at my article, "Developing your Big Player" for a starter.


Email:
ddog_04@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/16/02

Question

how can i build muscle fast for my upper body and legs

Answer

Simply stated, eat good food, get lots of rest and work out with weights. Now, one thing I don't do is make specific recommendations on weight workouts because I don't know anything about you. I'm sure you have a teacher or a local health club rep that can help you out.

Try this link and see what you think - Off season camps and workouts


Email:
griff4788@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/14/02

Question

Hello, My question is how do the defense really play a matchup zone?. What are the assignments for each player?and why would a team want to play a match up zone and not play man to man or 3-2/ 2-3 zone. I coach a 7th grade AAU team, my forwards are very tall and not really quick and I perfer to play man to man. Several good teams used their speed when we played man to man by taking my big men out and driving to the basket on them. I was thanking a matchup zone may give us good intensity and keep my big men close to the basket.

Answer

A similar question was so well answered on the Basketball Highway that I think it best to refer you there. Go to http://www.bbhighway.com/Talk/Coaching_Box/Ask_Coach/atc_q244.asp


Email:
ehartley@auracom.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
1/13/02

Question

I have a real young girls basketball team, these are, Jr. girls playing at their first year at the Sr. level. They all have talent but lack the experience of this level, I remind them ALL the time that the experience will come, and good things will happen if we keep working hard and give 110% in every practice and game. We have lost ( almost ) all our games but never a blow - out, ( within 2 - 14 points ) which I tell them they should be proud of because they are playing experienced players . Anyways, they are lacking the confidence in themselves and go into games thinking / saying they suck and are going to get beat, (which approach should I take from here on? )

Answer

As my sons advanced, they went through the same weak team/strong team cycle playing in 5th/6th, 7th/8th, etc. divisions. The weak year, winning half the games was the goal. The strong year, winning the championship was the goal. We usually didn't achieve either. Actually, with your margins as close as they are, you are doing very well.

One nice thing about being an under-dog is that the wins you do get are so sweet. You can take them out for treats or host a party if they win. Always try to get them to look to the future, though. In a couple years, they will have long forgotten this year's w/l records, but they will remember the fun they had and the skills they learned. Try to get them in the mindset of planning ahead for their next season. And, maybe they will relish the role of being an upset team - the spoilers. Make the upsets their mission, and if they accept that, every game becomes an exciting story. Good luck - I wish I had a magic answer, but its a year of character building as well as skill development.


Email:
afcrew@hotmail.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
1/13/02

Question

Hi. I think your site is great and I have used plenty of your plays and drills. I really need some advice. I have been coaching girls 7th-8th grade basketball for the past 3 years. This year is our first year without a solid point guard. I have a few girls who have decent ball handling skills but we are having problems getting into any type of offense. We're having trouble initiating any type of offense and part of that has to do with players getting open on the wings but there is always the issue of not having strong guard play. We do have a plentiful amount of forward type players. Do you have any suggestions on a type of offense or style of play? It is about mid way through a very tough season and we are trying to avoid any further embarassment for the players as well as the coaches. Any suggestions or advice would be truly appreciated. Thanks.

Answer

Guards are the most influential players at that age. If your guards are weak, the season will be a struggle. I have been on both sides of that situation. Look first at your wings. It is very common for the wings to be too stationary. They should work very hard and very early to get open. A jab step or two once the point guard is in place is too little and too late. I want my wings to go all the way to the baseline and back, or around the post, or to the baseline and out the other side to get open. That makes the point guard's job much easier. Then, instead of dribbling, she can pass early. I like my point to pass and pick away. This causes a rotation on the top so all three perimeter players are at the point eventually. That would work for you, too. Another way to get the ball to the wing is simply dribble there while the wing exchanges to the top.

You may be having trouble passing from the wing to the post as well. Break your team down into pairs and practice this element 2:2. Inexperienced guards usually lack subtle skills like faking and creating space with their body and stepping through the defense to execute passes. 2:2 can expose such elements. I also have a guantlet drill on the site that may help.

Your offense needs to be simple. Try the 2-Lo or Hi-Lo in the article Easy offensive sets. If you think your players are more advanced, try the Alaska Play. The Alaska Play is a basic motion offense with rules to keep things organized.


Email:
ad_hawkins@msn.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/5/02

Question

Coach, what is the best way to beat a team that has 2 guards picking up my point guard right when she crosses 1/2 court. I coach a 8th grade girsl team. Thanks

Andre Hawkins

Answer

Pass the ball. I don't mean to simplify your problem, but if you are dependent upon your point to bring the ball all the way up the court, you're in trouble. Instead, give her passing options. Just before the two guards pick her up, ideally right when they are committed to her but before they can trap her, have teammates come towards her on each side of the floor, but in the front court. That way she can have a choice, left or right, to pass before she meets the defense. The defense will be forced to adjust. Your point can either continue and maybe get the ball back or go set a screen for the teammate at the sideline who did not get the ball. The screened teammate can then cut toward the ball or to the basket.


Email:
andecris@yahoo.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/3/02

Question

i am really interested in coaching girls basketball on the high school level. i am from houston,texas and what really made me want to become a coach is one for the love i have for the game but secondly i dont really see to many dedicated female coaches in houston. i am presently in the Navy and i will soon be going to college. I wanted to ask you what courses could i take and what is the best way to become a high school coach. i am 19 now and i know i have a long time to get ready but i really want to start early. i am respectful requesting answers or tips to get to that level. thanks, SNSA Crystal Jones

Answer

I wish I had decided to be a high school basketball coach as early as you. I could be so much better now. Oh, well. I'll offer you these suggestions:

  1. The main reason you should coach is because you love to help kids. Love of the game is good and so is improving the presence of women in the coaching ranks. But loving to see kids grow up into better people through basketball is the reward you'll savor for a lifetime.
  2. Take the courses you need to establish your career. High school coaching is not a career. Teaching is a career and as a teacher the doors to coaching will be very open to you.
  3. You may be able to take elective course related to coaching. Check with your counselor.
  4. If you decide to work in a non-teaching profession, you will need to work as a volunteer assistant for a while. That takes a lot of commitment and dedication. But, you can learn a lot from a good mentor coach. Find one and offer your assistance. You'll gain training and gain an excellent reference source.
  5. Coach youth teams - like elementary kids in a YMCA program. You'll have a chance to be a head coach and develeop your style and practice your teaching techniques. Young kids play very exciting games. Don't worry about not maintaining your interest level!

Good luck. I wish you success.


Email:
ehartley@auracom.com
Response Type:
Private email requested
Date:
1/4/02

Question

I am coaching a high school girls team, I am having a problem getting them to pass the ball, and to control the ball. they panic every time. They will not run a proper offence. how do I help this. Tried just about everything.

Answer

Its hard for me to see the root problems from here. There isn't one magic bullet to solve the symptoms you describe. Are the girls confused? Break the game down into little bite-sized chunks, literally into working on each individual pass they are supposed to make as they come down the floor. Practice every detail by itself that comprises your offense - every screen, every pass, every cut. It will take some time, but they will gradually pull the parts of the whole game together.

Sometimes it just takes a little floor leadership. When I am watching my guys struggle, I might get in the play myself. I can often spot problems as a player. Also, I notice tha the team I am on suddenly seems more organized. That's because they readily relinquish leadership to me. However, that won't help them in games, but I try to make teaching leadership part of the practice. We talk about eye contact, verbal communication and most importantly, team commitment to the game plan. Everybody must buy into the team plan. It just takes a maverick or two to throw the plan into chaos. Make them understand that. Ask for their patience as they learn to work together because it won't come quickly. If they see it as a team goal, they will notice the improvement and take satisfaction in the progress. That will build their confidence. But the key is everybody working to make plan work and not giving up on it. Good luck.


Email:
griff4788@aol.com
Response Type:
Date:
1/2/02

Question

Happy New Year! I coach 7th & 8th grade boys. I have a very good 7th grade team with a very good 6' 2" player. I like to get him the ball as much as possible in the low and high blocks as well as medium range jump shots. Do u have any suggestions or an offense we can use.

Answer

We have an option in out motion offense that says if the post doesn't get the ball from the wing within two seconds, he cuts aways from the ball and sets a screen for the other post (in this case your tall player). Breaking toward the ball, he is an easier target and will get the ball in various locations in the key. Also, he doesn't have his back to the basket so much when he gets the ball. The screen can go from low post to low post, or from high to low, or even diagonal across the key.